På svenska.

On behalf of Sweden, Norway and Denmark the Swedish representant, University Chancellor Undén gave, when the General Assembly of the League of Nations discussed about a resolution condemning the Soviet action against Finland and about a statement saying that the Soviet Union no longer is a member of the League, the following declaration:

Our countries are for years worked in close cooperation with Finland. The Nordic countries have firmly decided to stay outside of any great Power groups or alliances, and by means of this fundamental principle they have sought to protect their peace and independence. No doubt that the invasion to which Finland has fallen a victim has nowhere else shocked the general opinion more deeply than in other Nordic countries. The strong sympathies of our peoples are today with their neighbouring people whom the events have affected so cruelly. We can especially confirm the statements in the [League of Nation's] report which show that Finland, with even at the cost of heavy sacrifices tried to avoid every confrontation with her mighty neighbour, which on this very moment threatens her freedom and independence. With reference to the known attitude of our governments against sanctions, our delegations declare that they will refrain from taking a standpoint on the resolution, in which there are actions that fall within the category of sanctions. Finally, we will express our deep conviction that Finland, strengthened by her just cause, the admirable unity of her people and her strong national will, will win back the peace with survived independence and freedom.

The Newspaper "Stockholms-Tidningen".


Source: Svensk utrikespolitik under andra världskriget. Internationell politik 24, skrifter utgivna av Utrikespolitiska institutet, Kooperativa förbundets bokförlag, Stockholm, 1946. (Swedish Foreign Policy under the Second World War, Stockholm, 1946). Translation: Pauli Kruhse

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