In Finnish

Telegram from the Finnish Legation in Moscow to the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, August 22, 1940

After the Aaland matter, on August 22, I presented an explanation of the SNS on the basis of documents that I had received. Commissar Molotov listened and said that he doubted the correctness of our information. A lengthy discussion ensued which disclosed strong suspicion toward us. When I stated that in Finland there exists a general effort to establish good relations with the USSR, Commissar Molotov replied that the people desire it, to be sure, but the government's attitude is divided. It has been stated in our government circles, he claimed, that nobody who accepts the Peace of Moscow is a Finn. I said that it is impossible that such a statement could have been made, pointed to Prime Minister Ryti's speech, and to the fact that we have made arrangements for all the matters that have so far come. To this M. Molotov answered that unfortunately his contention was correct. He also claimed that we were hard at work on defenses in Hanko and along our border, and that hatred of the USSR is spread among the soldiers. I referred to my earlier statement concerning the duty of an independent state to look to its defenses, and I denied the stimulation of hatred among the soldiers. M. Molotov suggested that we are counting on some new turn, favorable to us, in the present Great War. I told him that this was the first time I had heard that thought expressed. M. Molotov stated that Tanner, in returning to the Elanto Co-operative, had only stepped behind the scenes. I pointed once again to Prime Minister Ryti's speech, whereupon M. Molotov said that the Prime Minister had side-stepped the main issue. In spite of my explanations, M. Molotov held on to his contentions, as he has ever done.

Paasikivi.


Source: Finland reveals her secret documents on Soviet policy, March 1940—June 1941. Doc. nr. 26. Wilfred Funk, New York 1941.
The book is a verbatim translation of the "Blue-White Book" published by the Foreign Ministry of Finland, 1941.

Finland in the Soviet foreign policy 1939-1940