In Finnish

Telegram from the Moscow Legation to the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, November 20, 1940

Commissar Molotov invited me on November 19 to the Kremlin, and said that he had had talks in Berlin about the nickel. He told me that Germany withdrew from the concession and had no objection to the transfer of the concession to the USSR. Germany was interested in delivery of nickel, Commissar Molotov remarked about our agreement with [I.G.] Farben Industrie. He regarded Great Britain's temporary consent as adequate; the Finnish Government can therefore decide the matter at once. He demanded that the matter should at last be settled. I answered that I had pointed out all along that the unconditional consent of Great Britain and the nickel company was essential. Great Britain had consented on condition Germany receives no nickel. I said that I had understood M. Molotov to accept our standpoint that the consent of the nickel company was needed. M. Molotov replied that that was a misconception; "You have always spoken about the consent of the company, but I have not approved that standpoint." He said that we must arrange the question in one way or another. With reference to the British condition that no nickel was to go to Germany, M. Molotov said: "Sell all the nickel to the USSR, which will take care of the matter." I understood that the USSR would give Germany her share. M. Molotov demanded in an insistent tone that the nickel affair be settled without delay. I informed him that I had notified my government of my conversation with M. Vyshinski on November 12, and was awaiting a reply. I promised an answer in a few days' time.

Paasikivi.


Source: Finland reveals her secret documents on Soviet policy, March 1940—June 1941. Doc. nr. 46. Wilfred Funk, New York 1941.
The book is a verbatim translation of the "Blue-White Book" published by the Foreign Ministry of Finland, 1941.

The contemporary Peoples' Commissariat for Foreign Affairs report on the Paasikivi-Molotov discussion (in Russian).

Finland in the Soviet foreign policy 1939-1940