THE TELEGRAM OF THE PLENIPOTENTIARY OF THE USSR IN THE USA K. A. UMANSKY TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF THE USSR

December 4, 1939
Immediately. Top secret

The White House and the State Department put into the head of journalists the idea that the lack of a written response from the Soviet government to the Roosevelt appeal about the bombing, written with the consent of the Finnish government, is equivalent to the refusal of the Soviet Government, whose statement about the pointlessness of the Roosevelt appeal is allegedly refuted by reports of "eyewitnesses" about civilian victims from the US Mission Helsinki, which Roosevelt has to trust. All this is stated in order to further encourage anti-Soviet harassment and in order for the press to clarify for itself Roosevelt's "moral embargo" as relating to us and only to us. Japan is not mentioned in this connection at all, but compared to Hull's statement on June 11, 1938 about the sale of aircraft to countries practicing the bombardment of civilians (then Japan was meant, although it was not named by name), yesterday's statement Roosevelt is broader because it mentions not only aircraft (obviously including civil ones), but also all aircraft equipment, as well as the "materials" necessary for the production of aircraft. Under the latter category, the State Department, in its pressure on industrialists, may try to bring not only raw materials, in particular duralumin, but also machine tools, presses and other equipment for aircraft factories. Douglas, Lockheed, Northrop, and some other firms declined to adhere to the moral embargo, especially since aircraft factories are loaded with Anglo-French orders. Judging by the precedent with Japan, all this should not affect the concluded contracts and allowed orders. Apparently, the American government believes that since the fiction of USSR omission by name was observed, there is no formal violation of our trade agreement providing for unlimited most favorable conditions.
Umansky
Foreign policy documents RF, f. 059, op. 1, p. 296, d. 2049, l. 172-173.
Source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation. Foreign policy documents. 1939. XXII: 2. Nr 835. Moscow: Intern. relations, 1992. Computer assisted draft translation by Pauli Kruhse.

Finland in the Soviet foreign policy 1939-1940